Seven Stories Press

Works of Radical Imagination

Output-f_feature

Paperback introduction by Neil Gaiman

From Slapstick's "Turkey Farm" to Slaughterhouse-Five's eternity in a Tralfamadorean zoo cage with Montana Wildhack, the question of the afterlife never left Kurt Vonnegut's mind. In God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian, Kurt Vonnegut skips back and forth between life and the afterlife as if the difference between them were rather slight. In thirty odd "interviews," Vonnegut trips down "the blue tunnel to the pearly gates" in the guise of a roving reporter for public radio, conducting interviews with: Salvatore Biagini, a retired construction worker who died of a heart attack while rescuing his schnauzer from a pit bull; John Brown, still smoldering 140 years after his death by hanging; William Shakespeare, who rubs Vonnegut the wrong way; and socialist and labor leader Eugene Victor Debs, one of Vonnegut's personal heroes.

What began as a series of ninety-second radio interludes for WNYC, New York City's public radio station, has evolved into this provocative collection of musings about who and what we live for, and how much it all matters in the end. From the original portrait by his friend Jules Feiffer that graces the cover, to a final entry from Kilgore Trout, God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian remains a joy.

Read an excerpt on Issuu here.

Output-f_feature

Buying options

“[A] delightful fictional foray in which Vonnegut, courtesy of Dr. Death, toggles back and forth between life and afterlife, meditating on death by way of very short ‘interviews’ with the likes of Newton, Shakespeare, and a penitent Hitler.”

“A smattering of wit, a splattering of satire, and a plop of colorful commentary. Not to mention Vonnegut’s signature steely irony.”

blog — October 12

Welcome to Our New Site: 50% Off Some of Seven Stories' Greatest Hits

Politics and fiction, protest and celebration, militancy and tenderness: Over the past twenty years, Seven Stories has earned a reputation for bringing books that might otherwise have been marginalized into the mainstream conversation. Our credo is that publishers have a special responsibility to defend free speech and celebrate the gifts of the imagination—from Noam Chomsky’s 9-11, a surprise bestseller that provided a dissident voice in a time of crisis, to the speculative fiction of Octavia Butler, which blazed a new path for the novel of conscience, to Innosanto Nagara’s A is for Activist, an ABC board book for a new generation of engaged young readers.

To carry on that project into the 21st century, we've launched this new site. And to set things off right, we're offering 50% some of Seven Stories' most beloved titles for one week only.

Check out the titles below, and activate the discount code here.

Output-f_feature

Born in 1922 in Indianapolis, Indiana, Kurt Vonnegut was one of the few grandmasters of modern American letters. Called by the New York Times “the counterculture’s novelist,” his works guided a generation through the miasma of war and greed that was life in the U.S. in second half of the 20th century. After stints as a soldier, anthropology PhD candidate, technical writer for General Electric, and salesman at a Saab dealership, Vonnegut rose to prominence with the publication of Cat’s Cradle in 1963. Several modern classics, including Slaughterhouse-Five, soon followed. Never quite embraced by the stodgier arbiters of literary taste, Vonnegut was nonetheless beloved by millions of readers throughout the world. “Given who and what I am,” he once said, “it has been presumptuous of me to write so well.” Kurt Vonnegut died in New York in 2007.