Seven Stories Press

Works of Radical Imagination

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Adapted by Rebecca Stefoff

Jared Diamond's first foray into illustrated young adult nonfiction is both an explosive indictment of human nature and a hopeful case for a better survival.

At some point during the last 100,000 years, humans began exhibiting traits and behavior that distinguished us from other animals. This peculiar species eventually creating language, art, religion, bicycles, spacecraft, and nuclear weapons—all within a heartbeat of evolutionary time. Now, faced with the threat of nuclear weapons and the effects of climate change, it seems our innate tendencies for violence and invention have led us to a crucial fork in our road. Where did these traits come from? Are they part of our immutable destiny? Or is there hope for our species' future if we change?

With fascinating facts and his unparalleled readability, Diamond intended his book to improve the world that today's young people will inherit. Triangle Square's The Third Chimpanzee for Young People is a stunning guide to this mixed bag inheritance.

Click here to hear Jared Diamond discussing The Third Chimpanzee for Young People in an exclusive, web-only video series!

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Buying options

“This is exactly the kind of book that should be a 'set text' for a reinvigorated science curriculum: engaging, thought-provoking and bang up to the minute. If your teachers aren't recommending books like this – go out and get them anyway.”

“Written with great wit and a pleasure to read ... forces one to reflect thoroughly on the puzzle of human evolution, on where we came from and where we may be heading.”

“Plenty of provocative ideas in this grand sweep of evolutionary biology and anthropology: not surprising for this MacArthur 'genius' Award winner, Natural History columnist, and UCLA Medical School physiology professor.”

blog — September 17

Teach A People's History

 
Who needs Trump's 1776 Commission? Certainly not us. Kids deserve more than nationalist propaganda. They deserve to learn a complete history of the United States of the people and for the people. And we can help.

 
To teach a people’s history is to consider the historical perspective of the marginalized and the oppressed. It is to acknowledge the historical impact of people from all backgrounds; to share the groundbreaking cultural and political contributions of everyday people, not just the stories promoted by (and beneficial to) those in power. When we teach history from this perspective, we can uncover a better understanding of how our present came to be. By sharing these stories, we equip children with the foundation needed to make lasting, meaningful change in our society –– for the good of all of us.

Young people have been making important contributions to history for centuries. To take a few examples from Howard Zinn's A Young People's History of the United States: There's Anyokah, the child who helped bring written language to her Cherokee people. There are the young laborers who—to the benefit of their peers toiling in cotton mills, canneries, and mines—stood up for themselves with the National Child Labor Committee's Declaration of Dependence. And there's John Tinker, the high school student who fought all the way to the Supreme Court for freedom of expression at school—and won. Our mission with the For Young People series is not to talk down to the young, but to make accessible versions of some of the best books around, and thereby giving young people the facts and inspiration they may need in order to lift their voices up.

For more teaching resources, visit:

Zinn Education Project

Teaching for Change

Free Teaching Guides, Lesson Plans, & Other Resources

A Young People's History of the United States Lesson Plan

1493 for Young People: From Columbus's Voyage to Globalization

A Different Mirror for Young People Teaching Guide

Eiffel's Tower for Young People Teaching Guide

A Road Map to Howard Zinn's Writings Published by Seven Stories Press

Ink Knows No Borders Teaching Guide

Martha and the Slave Catchers Teaching Guide 

  

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In addition to teaching geography at UCLA, researching the birds of New Guinea and the Southwest Pacific Islands, and promoting the practice of sustainable environmental policies to leaders around the world, JARED DIAMOND is also the author of bestselling books about evolution and human history. Diamond studied physiology at Harvard and Cambridge, before narrowing his research to the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gall bladder. It was on a summer trip to New Guinea in 1964, however, that he first began to carefully consider the questions that would intrigue him for the next half-century: why did New Guinea’s extremely intelligent and resourceful indigenous peoples have no writing, chiefs, or steel tools? His Pulitzer Prize-winning Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies was an attempt to answer that question. Diamond is the author of several other books on geography and evolutionary biology, including Why is Sex Fun?: The Evolution of Human Sexuality and Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed. The Third Chimpanzee for Young People is his first book adapted for younger audiences. Diamond lives in Los Angeles.