Posts tagged “publishers weekly”

  • Irish author Martha Long discusses her book Ma, He Sold Me for a Few Cigarettes, at Elliott Bay in Seattle

    January 24, 2014

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    Friday, January 24th at 7pm
    University Book Store
    4326 University Way, N.E.
    Seattle, Washington 98105

    Join bestselling Irish author Martha Long, whose seven ‘Ma’ books about her extraordinary survival of the poverty-ridden streets of Dublin in the 60s have caused a sensation in Ireland and the UK. Martha will be speaking about her first book and the strength it took to tell her story, at her very first American book reading at University Book Store on Friday, January 24th at 7pm.

     Ma, He Sold Me for a Few Cigarettes is Martha’s heartbreaking story of a little girl faced with the difficult task of surviving in a world set against her. Born to a teenage mother in the slums of Dublin, Martha quickly learned to use her mischievousness, courage and wit to get her through the most desperate situations, never giving up hope that a better life existed for her. She rarely went to school, spent days going shop to shop stealing butter, begged for food and clothes from the convent, and did all she could to steer clear of her stepfather, Jackser (“that bandy ‘aul bastard”).

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  • Censored 2014: “brutal yet essential reading”

    October 8, 2013

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    Publisher’s Weekly recently reviewed Censored 2014: Fearful Speech in Fateful Times, noting that although these stories are hard to read, and even harder to believe, they are a must.

    “This book is evident of Project Censored’s profoundly important work in educating readers on current events and the skills needed to be a critical thinker.” 

    Read the full review here.

    For almost forty years, Project Censored has has worked round-the-clock for the advocacy and protection of First Amendment rights and the freedom of information in the United States. Censored 2014 includes stories that you didn’t hear about, but should have, including the rise of anti-government groups in the US; human rights violations at home and abroad; environmental threats, including fracking; and maybe most importantly, “Junk Food News” and the media’s tendency towards misinformation, deception, and propaganda.

    For more information, buy your copy of Censored 2014: Fearful Speech in Fateful Times, or visit www.projectcensored.org.

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  • Publishers Weekly Reviews Nader’s “Told You So”

    August 13, 2013

    Publishers Weekly Reviewed Ralph Nader’s Told You So: The Big Book of Weekly Columns

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    Full Review from August 5, 2013:

    “The iconic consumer affairs crusader and former presidential candidate assembles a trove of more than 250 opinion pieces dating from some of his earliest 1970s gigs in the commentariat to musings through 2011. An unrepentant progressive, Nader’s devastating critiques of the news media, the financial sector, Supreme Court, among other institutions will warm the hearts of like-minded readers. Several columns scrutinize President Obama for a host of deficiencies including his insistence on seeking a middle ground that does not exist, genuflecting to big business, and his failure to fight for a single payer health care system. Nader is at his polemical best inveighing against specific issues from the skyrocketing costs of college education to the Keystone XL pipeline to new traffic safety concerns that harken back to his pivotal game-changing 1965 book, Unsafe at Any Speed.

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  • The Graphic Canon Volume 3 is “the most beautiful book of 2013″

    June 25, 2013

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    On sale todayThe Graphic Canon Volume 3 was just named  ”The Most Beautiful Book of 2013″ in a recent feature on Publishers Weekly.

    Check out this introduction by editor Russ Kick, who goes on to comment on fifteen works included in the volume, from Heart of Darkness to The Awakening to Animal Farm.

    My hands were quivering as I recently opened the package containing my advance copy of The Graphic Canon, Volume 3. The project was complete. Over the course of three huge volumes, more than 120 illustrators and comics artists had given their visual take on 181 classic works of literature, from ancient days to the end of the twentieth century.

    The Graphic Canon was conceived as an art project and as a celebration of literature. It turned into a lot more, including a visual primer on world literature, an encyclopedia of ways to combine words and images, a showcase for the power of illustration and sequential art, and a source of controversy (the word “canon” has gotten under some people’s skin, and the sex and nudity in a few of the pieces have shocked people who apparently didn’t realize that the great works deal with that aspect of the human condition too).

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  • “Ma, He Sold Me for a Few Cigarettes”, a “haunting memoir” of 1950s Dublin by Martha Long is on sale now!

    December 5, 2012

    Counterpunch says “This is a searing account of childhood survival.  No more haunting memoir has been published this year.”

    Publishers Weekly gives the book a starred review: “Bestselling memoirist Martha Long takes readers to 1950s Dublin, where it is nothing short of a miracle that she survived her childhood. Long chronicles her life from ages three to 11, letting the child she once was ‘tell the story in her own voice:’ a dynamic, colorful Irish dialect. Not for the faint of heart, Long’s story is a gritty, grueling, and heartbreaking testament to one girl’s unbreakable spirit.”

    “Reading this startling testament to one child’s valiant attempts to live until the age of sixteen is a worthy reminder that we can do better as adults if we turn to embrace the children who are suffering, anywhere on earth…”—Alice Walker, from the forward 

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  • Publishers Weekly calls Graphic Canon Vol 2 a “a must-have anthology”

    October 1, 2012

    The Graphic Canon Volume 2: From “Kubla Khan” to the Brontë Sisters to The Picture of Dorian Gray (ON SALE TOMORROW) edited by Russ Kick, gets a rave review in Publishers Weekly!

    “Comprising original graphic versions of classic literature, from Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” to Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, this is the second volume of a must-have anthology for those who wish to lose themselves utterly in visual narrative adaptations of the works of the Western canon.”

    “Apart from containing insightful introductions and wonderful artwork, these selections have a not-to-be-underestimated pedagogical value that educators will no doubt find invaluable in bringing classic works of literature to a 21st-century audience immersed in visual culture.”

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  • Andri Magnason’s LoveStar gets starred review in PW

    September 18, 2012

    “In this outlandish yet poignant dystopian allegory, Magnason (Dreamland: A Self-Help Manual for a Frightened Nation) imagines a post-technological world in which the relationship between people and information is turned on its head. “Cordless” citizens are freed from gadgets and wires while REGRET, something like a retroactive Magic 8 Ball if envisioned by Vonnegut, renders every choice the right one. Louts hoping to pay down debt become “ad howlers,” “AdTraps,” and “Secret Hosts”—human bullhorns spouting targeted advertisements or post-purchase praise (“YOU WERE UNBELIEVABLY COOL TO BUY SUCH GROOVY SHOES!”) to pedestrians. At funerals run by LoveDeath, bodies are launched into space and mourners watch their loved ones “burn up under the heavenly plough” upon re-entry. At the helm of this carefully monitored and controlled society is LoveStar, a God-like old man with three hours left to live and a mission to “free people from the oppression of freedom.” Then there’s Indridi and Sigrid, who want to stick together despite inLOVE’s calculation of Sigrid as better matched with a Danish man.

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  • Andri Magnason’s Story of the Blue Planet gets starred review in PW

    September 10, 2012

    “While fairly unknown in the U.S., Magnason is an acclaimed author in his native Iceland. His sly, smart parable, first published in 1999, takes aim at the central dilemma of the developed world: is it ethical to be happy at the cost of others’ suffering? The tranquil Blue Planet, inhabited only by children, is jolted when fast-talking grownup Gleesome Goodday parachutes in and teaches its children to fly. (To supply the service on a permanent basis he charges them, insidiously, just the tiniest fraction of their youth.) Blown off course, friends Brimir and Hulda find out quite by chance that because they can fly, another group of children has no sunlight, safety, or food. Mr. Goodday is unruffled by their discovery: “There’s as much happiness in the world now as there was previously, it’s just been readjusted,” he says. Dahl-like wit and a couple of eccentrically Arctic moments (seals are for eating, and Brimir and Hulda suckle the milk of a she-wolf) make this a memorable and provocative tale, and a splendid opener for discussions about our own blue planet.” Ages 8–12.

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  • Ma, He Sold Me For a Few Cigarettes gets starred review in Publishers Weekly

    September 6, 2012

    “Bestselling memoirist Long (Ma, I’ve Got Meself Locked Up in the Mad House) takes readers to 1950s Dublin, where it is nothing short of a miracle that she survived her childhood. Long chronicles her life from ages three to 11, letting the child she once was “tell the story in her own voice:” a dynamic, colorful Irish dialect. Born to a destitute teenage mother, Long endures shocking privation and abuse, particularly at the hands of her mother’s lascivious long-term boyfriend, who does indeed sell her for a few cigarettes. Trapped by her circumstances, Long must care for a growing brood of siblings, and though barely educated she finds ingenious ways to provide for her family. A penny candy, a broken roller-skate, a meal from a stranger: small treasures and kindnesses, though rare, give Long the strength she needs to hope for a better future. Her tale can be repetitive, but the repetition aptly mirrors the punishing cycle of poverty.

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  • Publisher’s Weekly Reviews Trevor: A Novella

    August 3, 2012

    “Trevor: A Novella”
    James Lecesne. Seven Stories, $14.95 (96p) ISBN 978-1-60980-420-6

    Lecesne (Virgin Territory) updates his Oscar-winning short film, Trevor (itself developed from his one-man stage show), turning it into a novella. It’s the story of 13-year-old Trevor, a boy who stages a re-enactment of Jacques-Louis David’s La Mort de Marat in his bathtub and plans to dress up as his idol, Lady Gaga, for Halloween. (In the Trevor film, the teenager was a diehard Diana Ross fan.) While Trevor isn’t ready to declare himself gay, he doesn’t want anyone else doing so on his behalf, either (“Some of us prefer to remain a mystery—even to ourselves”). Trevor’s interests (Lady Gaga, theater, his baseball-playing buddy Pinky) make him a target, however, culminating in the word “faggot” being scrawled on his locker and a subsequent suicide attempt. Given the story’s long history, it’s no surprise that Lecesne nails Trevor’s personality and voice, a combination of self-assuredness, sharp humor, and enthusiasm.

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