Posts tagged “biography”

  • Letter from the Editor: on <i>Unstuck in Time</i> and <i>And So it Goes…</i>

    Letter from the Editor: on Unstuck in Time and And So it Goes…

    November 21, 2011

    "It is hard to build a career by saying or writing nice things about people. And yet, not only was Kurt beloved, he can be credited for freeing American literature from some of the stiffness and formality that had always marked it previously. He made the province of American literature much less provincial."

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  • Tony Hefner interviewed in the San Antonio Current

    Tony Hefner interviewed in the San Antonio Current

    September 9, 2010

    You left to go get religious training? I started going to church then. And that’s where I realized people weren’t prejudiced. That people really loved people and [I saw] a whole different realm of things … treating you like you was a human being. That’s why whenever I seen this going on at that detention facility, all these flashbacks kept coming back. Like what? These poor, immigrant people are just trying to make a living, trying to please people, and still try to take care of their families. A lot of them are just migrant workers. I talked to a lot of them in the detention facility who knew English real well, because my Spanish was terrible. They’re just hard-working people who … for hundreds of years they’ve been crossing the border. And they come over here and they work in our fields and they pick our fruits. … I mean, those are jobs that most Americans don’t want. Oh yeah, they want the supervisor job where they can boss the people around, where they don’t have to get out there and pick the fruit and work in some of these different places. —from Tony Hefner's interview about Between the Fences

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  • Cynthia O’Neal and Talk Softly profiled in San Francisco Chronicle

    Cynthia O’Neal and Talk Softly profiled in San Francisco Chronicle

    June 24, 2010

    ... There is an aside in the book that more than sums up the extraordinary journey of Cynthia O'Neal's life. She is in New Mexico, having dinner with her son, Fitz, who is trying to figure out his own path in life and decides that his ability to size people up might lead him to a job placing children with adoptive families. He'd know, he says, if someone would make a good parent or not: "There it was - the question of what my son thought of me as a parent - there it was lying right on the table ... I took a very deep breath and said, 'What about me, would you have given me a child?' Fitz looked me right in the eye and replied, 'I wouldn't have then. I would now.' "— San Francisco Chronicle on Cynthia O'Neal and Talk Softly

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  • Paul Verhoeven on Jesus of Nazareth

    Paul Verhoeven on Jesus of Nazareth

    February 4, 2010

    From an interview at Cinema-Scope with Robert Koehler, from just after the 2006 release of Paul Verhoeven's film The Black Book: ... You had this strange encounter with Pentecostal Christianity. How did that happen, and how did your reaction to that experience prompt your concern for reality and even hyper-reality? My then-future wife Martine got pregnant in 1966, and we didn’t want a child at the time. I was just starting my film career, and the prospect of an unplanned child might force me to abandon film at least temporarily. To a large degree, it was disturbing: during that period, I had a sense that I was losing my mind. I wouldn’t say a psychosis, but it felt close to that. My response was to become a member of a Pentecostal church, for a month. It was an existential need. This wasn’t common in Holland in the ‘60s... This encounter with spiritual, mystical Christianity had an enormous impact on me.

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  • Anarchist Writers interview with Bakunin author Mark Leier

    Anarchist Writers interview with Bakunin author Mark Leier

    December 29, 2009

    What would you say Bakunin has to offer today’s radicals? First, he offers some hope, hope in the importance of struggle. This was an activist who fought on the losing side all of his life, yet did not lose his passionate hope, his understanding, that the struggle itself was meaningful, for without it, the world would certainly get worse. While some seem him as a quixotic figure, I see him as one who realistically assessed the opportunities for success and failure and decided to fight for an ideal even when he thought there was no immediate chance of victory. Second, he offers a clear appraisal of what the radicals' targets should be. After all, capitalism and the state have not changed much since his time; Bakunin would recognize much in the 21st century. He wrote powerful critiques of capital and the state that still serve as useful starting points for understanding the world, and he did so in accessible, evocative language. Third, while there is a tendency to draw a dividing line between "classical anarchism" and contemporary anarchism and post-anarchism, a careful reading of Bakunin suggests that the "classical anarchists" wrestled with many of the same problems of goals, strategy, and tactics that anarchists face today. In fact, I believe that Bakunin offers a useful critique of today's post-anarchism, for the ideas of postmodernism that inform post-anarchism are not as new as its advocates suggest. That is, Bakunin rejected the idealist thought of his day to become a materialist and a realist, and I believe materialism and realism offer a stronger foundation for criticism than idealism and some variants of post-modernism.

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