Posts tagged “articles”

  • “Rebel Bookseller” Inspires Pittsburgh Entrepreneur

    March 20, 2013

    If you think the physical bookstore is dead, just try convincing Eric Ackland. Starting April 3rd, the 41-year-old Pittsburgh resident will take over ownership of the city’s beloved Awesome Books, renaming it Amazing Books.

    And it never would have happened without Andrew Laties’ Rebel Bookseller, the book which inspired Ackland to pursue his lifelong dream.

    Rebel Bookseller: Why Indie Businesses Represent Everything You Want to Fight for, from Free Speech to Buying Local to Building Communities is the culmination of Laties’ extensive thirty-year experience in bookselling and a powerful testament to the power of independent businesses to grow and transform, along with the communities of which they are inextricably a part. Rebel Bookseller is the story of Laties’ success in his own words, complete with personal anecdotes about “making it” and advice for those who wish to try their own hand at the competitive book business.

    “Bookstores are personal, quirky assemblages of the rich artifacts called books.

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • Chris Howard blogs on Tea of Ulaanbaatar at Kindle Daily Post

    Chris Howard blogs on Tea of Ulaanbaatar at Kindle Daily Post

    June 28, 2011

    Mongolia – the setting for my novel, Tea of Ulaanbaatar – traveled the path of the Society as War Machine, and emerged the worse for the experience. What Mongolia offers is a dire lesson for those who would travel in her empire-building footsteps, and a glimpse of America’s future. . . . The American Peace Corps volunteers of Tea of Ulaanbaatar, foremost the protagonist Warren, deal with this parallel in a variety of bad ways. The Gulf War lies behind them, and America’s contemporary wars loom ahead. They ultimately turn to the blood-red, hallucinogenic Mongol tea, Tsus, as a means of escape. The tea, more powerful than anything the West has ever seen, grants its long-term users the same visions of a warlike apocalypse, as if to say: To be consumed. To wither and deaden. This is what comes from empire-building. What are you going to do about it? At least the Mongols can say they didn’t have the benefit of history in their policy-making.—Christopher R. Howard, at Kindle Daily Post

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • John Tirman on “Citizen Zinn”

    John Tirman on “Citizen Zinn”

    May 6, 2011

    I think Zinn struggled with how one personally puts into practice the ideals of citizenship he promoted. He did protest racism and war, often getting arrested. He walked picket lines for workers seeking better wages. He delivered fiery speeches intended to spur his audiences to defiance. He testified at trials of dissidents (famously in Daniel Ellsberg’s Pentagon Papers trial) and took up the cause of many prisoners. What set him apart more than any other acts of solidarity and caring, however, was his role as an intellectual. — John Tirman, The Nation

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • WeGotThisCovered on Paul Verhoeven and Jesus of Nazareth

    WeGotThisCovered on Paul Verhoeven and Jesus of Nazareth

    May 3, 2011

    From Will Chadwick of the blog WeGotThisCovered:

    Of all the things you expect to read this isn’t one of them. Deadline has reported that Dutch filmmaker Paul Verhoeven has been attempting to get an adaptation of his co-written [sic] book Jesus of Nazareth off the ground. The report says that he and his reps have been trying to raise financing for about a year and a half, this is a project clearly that’s very close to his heart.

    Shockingly for Verhoeven, the book was cited as a very controversial work and attempted to look at the character of Jesus differently, he has said:

    If you look at the man, it’s clear you have a person who was completely innovative in the field of ethics. My own passion for Jesus came when I started to realize that. It’s not about miracles, it’s about a new set of ethics, an openness towards the world, which was anathema in a Roman-dominated world.

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • Kenneth Bernstein on Voices of a People’s History and Zinn Education Project

    Kenneth Bernstein on Voices of a People’s History and Zinn Education Project

    April 5, 2011

    . . . [Howard Zinn] wanted to wrest control of the past away from those who did not less know or understand the entire truth of our nation. It is up to those of us in the present to continue his task of reclaiming the full past, lest we surrender the future to those who do not value the ordinary people, who fear and despise the collective action - of unions, of the civil rights movement, of the anti-war movement, of the women's rights movement, of the movements for the rights of all who have been oppressed and left out. . . . We have many tasks to take on. Certainly winning elections is a major part. But so is how we educate our children. So is reaching out to adults who did not have the opportunity to truly learn our history and help them connect. You can help in this task in many ways. You can support the Zinn Educational Project. —Kenneth J. Bernstein

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • Why we’re publishing “There Are Things I Want You to Know About Stieg Larsson and Me”

    Why we’re publishing “There Are Things I Want You to Know About Stieg Larsson and Me”

    March 1, 2011

    The original title for Gabrielsson's book, and the one used in France, Sweden, and Norway, where the book was released last month, is Millennium, Stieg and Me. "We considered that title," says Seven Stories' publicity director Ruth Weiner. "But we wanted it to reflect how much of the book is about them and their love story." . . . As for the size of the first printing, says Seven Stories publisher Dan Simon, "We've done it before. But in these days it's a lot. It's not so different from Kurt Vonnegut's Man Without a Country in size and intentions, a first-person nonfiction that's not exactly a memoir. I'd be more nervous if it wasn't such a good book. The focus is like a Greek tragedy, like the Oresteia, the laws of the state versus higher laws."

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • Jack D. Forbes 1934-2011

    Jack D. Forbes 1934-2011

    March 1, 2011

    Seven Stories Press celebrates the life of Jack D. Forbes. From the Sacramento News: Mr. Forbes was a leading figure among Indians and scholars for his activism and research establishing indigenous people, history and culture as an academic subject. He also envisioned alternative colleges focused on serving American Indians and preserving indigenous cultures and values. . . . "Jack Forbes' passing is not only a loss for UC Davis but for the Native American studies academic community across the country," Chancellor Linda Katehi said in a written statement. "He was an inspirational and determined leader whose voice influenced the creation of Native American studies programs at UC Davis and around the country."

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • Ralph Nader’s letter to the New York Times

    Ralph Nader’s letter to the New York Times

    January 7, 2011

    "There are plenty of distinguished progressive champions lobbying, rallying, exposing, suing and organizing at the national, state and local level. Yet they have been mostly left out of the mass media . . . Meanwhile, the Tea Partiers have seen their modest initiatives hugely magnified and therefore expanded by major media. This has mainstreamed the radical right, including Sarah Palin, Glenn Beck, Ann Coulter and Pamela Geller, as well as the most extreme neoconservatives who still receive media attention despite their deceptive, disastrous Iraq war-mongering." - Ralph Nader, letter to New York Times

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • Aung San Suu Kyi freed

    Aung San Suu Kyi freed

    November 13, 2010

    From the New York Times: Myanmar’s pro-democracy leader, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, was freed from seven and a half years of house arrest on Saturday and was greeted at the gate of her compound by thousands of jubilant supporters. She stood waving and smiling as people cheered, chanted and sang the national anthem in a blur of camera flashes. She held a white handkerchief in one hand. “Thank you for welcoming me like this,” she said, clutching the iron bars of her gate as she looked out at the cheering crowd. “We haven’t seen each other for so long, I have so much to tell you.” She said she would speak again on Sunday at the headquarters of her now defunct political party, the National League for Democracy. “We must unite!” she said. “If we are united, we can get what we want.”

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share
  • Elizabeth Abbott: Marriage is often a casualty of war

    Elizabeth Abbott: Marriage is often a casualty of war

    November 12, 2010

    Rampant alcoholism and drug addiction, the "soldier's disease," wrecked havoc on marriages. So did venereal disease, contracted from prostitutes known as "horizontal refreshments." Symptoms included incontinence and impotence, and "No one knows how many Union and Confederate wives and widows went to their graves, rotted and ravaged by the pox that their men brought home," writes Civil War medical historian Thomas Lowry. Some demobilized husbands had grown closer to their wives through letters describing their experiences, including their fears, hopes, and emotional responses. Others, alienated by years of separation and hardship, had difficulty reconnecting with spouses. ("While you all was Haveing Such good times... on the 4th. we was Shooting Rebels," one young soldier observed.) Some women had had extramarital sex. Others, expecting their husbands to die in combat, entered new relationships. Some sold themselves to survive. When many veterans and their waiting wives reunited, they made each other miserable until they finally sought relief in separation or divorce. . . . What's wrong? Are broken marriages an inherent risk of military service? The sad answer is yes. —Elizabeth Abbott

    More Information »

    Tags: , , , ,

    Bookmark and Share