Posts tagged “women’s issues”

  • Women’s ENews features excerpt from The Unfinished Revolution

    September 26, 2012

    Women’s ENews featured an excerpt by Judith Sunderland, from the collection of essays The Unfinished Revolution, this past weekend. While many of us can agree that it is a human rights violation to force women to cover their head and face with a veil, few have thought about the other side of the coin. According the Sunderland’s excerpt:

    “The sad irony is that whether they are being forced to cover up or to uncover, these women are being discriminated against. Banned from wearing the hijab–a traditional Muslim headscarf–or forced to veil themselves, women around the world are being stripped of their basic rights to personal autonomy; to freedom of expression; and to freedom of religion, thought and conscience.”

    Sunderland’s article explains that although some European countries see banning veils as a means of liberation, it is yet another form of dictating how a woman will not only dress, but how she will represent herself and her religion, if she so chooses.

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  • Sabrina Chapadjiev interview on Live Through This

    Sabrina Chapadjiev interview on Live Through This

    October 5, 2010

    I was very clear with the authors that I was more interested in them talking about how they created — those environments, more than the environments and methods where they destroyed themselves. I do a workshop on art and self-destruction. In one exercise, we describe the physical environment where we hurt ourselves — where do we do it — what’s happening. We write this anonymously and read — and it’s always the same room. It’s always the same dark room, and the shades are drawn, and the air is crystallized with an uncertainty of our fate. We know those dark places so well; we don’t need them described. What is far more important, is seeing the environment of the way out. — Sabrina Chapadjiev, interviewed for Mildred Pierce

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  • Amy Steele of Entertainment Realm reviews In Our Control

    Amy Steele of Entertainment Realm reviews In Our Control

    June 30, 2010

    In Our Control doesn’t read like a scientific article but a wise and thoroughly researched expose on all aspects of contraception. Eldridge writes in a practical, often conversational format which should appeal to readers at all interest levels. ... In Our Control should be kept on one’s bookshelf for reference next to Our Bodies, Ourselves and FLOW. — Amy Steele of Entertainment Realm's review of In Our Control

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  • Leora Tanenbaum on Reality Check

    Leora Tanenbaum on Reality Check

    June 8, 2010

    From the June 6 edition of the podcast "Reality Check," here's Leora Tanenbaum talking to Amanda Marcotte about bad shoes, bunions, and the troubled relationship between fashion and women's health. Listen at the Reality Check website by clicking here.

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  • Ms. Magazine reviews In Our Control

    Ms. Magazine reviews In Our Control

    May 21, 2010

    Laura Eldridge’s new book In Our Control: The Complete Guide to Contraceptive Choices for Women (Seven Stories Press, 2010) isn’t kidding with that subtitle. The last time I remember reading so much detail about contraceptive options was poring over Our Bodies, Ourselves when I was in my 20s. ... Eldridge learned women’s health writing at the side of the late women’s health advocate and activist Barbara Seaman, and it shows. She contextualizes her work with her own experience and preferences, but provides thorough documentation so that women can more easily make their own decisions. This is women’s health activism at its best. — Elizabeth Kissling, Ms. Magazine

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  • Bad Shoes reviewed at Juxtapoz

    Bad Shoes reviewed at Juxtapoz

    May 19, 2010

    Growing up in a home where my mother covered the floor of her closet with pumps, sandals, flats, and more shoes than Imelda Marcos could shake a foot at, it’s no wonder that at 25 my shoe collection is nothing to play with. Being that my closet is filled with heels ranging from 3 ½”- 5”, I was quite skeptical when I began reading Bad Shoes and the Women Who Love Them by Leora Tanenbaum. While I do not plan on trading in my Calvin Klein platforms for a pair of Aerosoles, I have been convinced to be a bit more practical when deciding which shoes to wear to work versus the ones to wear on date nights. Leora Tanenbaum is no stranger to shining a light on some of the everyday issues that plague women in this seemingly modern age, her first three books dealt with slut-bashing, cat-fighting, and women reclaiming God. As a feminist writer, it seemed only natural for her to tackle to phenomenon of perfectly sensible women wearing shoes that are unhealthy in the name of fashion and feeling feminine. In the attempt to issue a much needed wake up call to the stilettoed masses, Tanenbaum enlists a bevy of experts on feet, fashion, and the Carrie Bradshaw wannabes who walk Manhattan in Louboutins to the detriment of their bodies. ... Overall the book is not a call for us to burn our heels but for us to become more informed consumers. —M.I.S.S. at Juxtapoz

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  • Leora Tanenbaum interviewed by Liz Funk

    Leora Tanenbaum interviewed by Liz Funk

    May 5, 2010

    ... What surprised you the most as you were writing and researching this book in particular? As I was speaking with women for my research, I would educate them and say, 'Guess what? If you wear a high-heeled shoe on a regular basis, over and over and over again, you're going to change the shape of your feet and be likely to have serious foot pain later. ' And occasionally women would say, 'Oh, I don't care, it's worth it. When it happens, I'll just have the surgery.' There was one woman in New York City whom I interviewed who told me that she wore these heels that weren't even that high but they were too narrow and too tight so she literally had to take them off and she didn't have money to take a cab home. She had to walk around the city barefoot. And I said, 'Oh, that's awful. So now you've learned a lesson, right? Next time, if you wear those shoes, you'll carry a second pair of comfortable shoes to change into.' She looked as me as though I was crazy. It was as though she felt, I must wear these shoes, even if it is unhealthy, because I look great. If you stand back and examine this, it's oppressive. She's a savvy, sophisticated woman but in her mind, she must wear a certain shoe in order to look attractive. — Lemondrop interview with Leora Tanenbaum

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  • Leora Tanenbaum on Phoebe Prince and Hope Witsell

    Leora Tanenbaum on Phoebe Prince and Hope Witsell

    April 13, 2010

    I am curious to know: why has [Phoebe] Prince's death elicited a far stronger reaction than [Hope] Witsell's? Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick has even stepped in, berating school officials for not protecting Prince. Meanwhile, to date no one has so strongly pointed a finger at school administrators at Witsell's school, nor have there been criminal charges brought in her case. This doesn't make sense. Both girls were victimized similarly. Both deaths are tragic. Both girls deserve the same outcry of anger and horror. Why does Prince's suicide resonate so much more than Witsell's? Because Prince, 15, more neatly fits the stereotype of a sympathetic "good" victim while Witsell does not. — Leora Tanenbaum

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  • Laura Eldridge interview on the anniversary of the Pill

    Laura Eldridge interview on the anniversary of the Pill

    April 6, 2010

    How did you come to write a book framed by an alternative viewpoint on the Pill? When I started working with Barbara Seaman, at the end of 1999 and just in time for the 40th anniversary of the Pill, it was actually a shock to me to realize as a feminist she had been very critical of the Pill. I thought of myself as an up and coming young feminist and bought into the popular idea that acceptance of the Pill was an integral part of second wave feminism and as such allowed for many of the gains women have made. Working with Barbara I got to understand how criticism of the Pill was part of the feminist movement, and that this history has been lost over time. With the 50th anniversary of the Pill coming up, all the articles are very glowing and suggest the Pill made feminism possible, but I know it is much more complicated than that. I thought it was the right time to present a reassessment of our birth control choices, to encourage women to broaden the contraceptive conversation. —Laura Eldridge, to Bitch magazine

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  • Kate Bornstein on Germaine Greer Guardian piece: “Has Germaine Greer Become a Ghastly Parody?”

    Kate Bornstein on Germaine Greer Guardian piece: “Has Germaine Greer Become a Ghastly Parody?”

    August 26, 2009

    In this new piece, Ms. Greer refers to transwomen—me and my brave sisters and mothers and daughters—as “ghastly parodies” of women. . . . Yes, yes. Ouch. It hurts to be called a ghastly parody. And that kind of talk feeds transphobia across the world. So, shame on The Guardian for printing these hateful words. But who is Ms. Greer to be hurling these invectives, and why? Greer is no one to dismiss as an idiot or complete jerk. . . . Germaine Greer's tragedy is that she has not considered as even possible the theory of gender fluidity. For her kind of activism to work, MAN and WOMAN can and must be essential as well as easy to tell apart from each other. . . . Ms. Greer is claiming that biology is, in fact destiny. — from Kate Bornstein's "Has Germaine Greer Become A Ghastly Parody?", written in response to this Guardian piece by Greer

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Goodreads Book Giveaway

Everytime a Knot is Undone, a God is Released by Barbara Chase-Riboud

Everytime a Knot is Undone, a God is Released

by Barbara Chase-Riboud

Giveaway ends August 31, 2014.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter to win

Goodreads Book Giveaway

The Crocodiles by Youssef Rakha

The Crocodiles

by Youssef Rakha

Giveaway ends September 16, 2014.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter to win

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